Vitamins and Minerals in Milk

Milk is used to make yogurt, cheese, ice milk, pudding, hot chocolate and french toast, among many other products. Milk is often added to dry breakfast cereal, porridge and granola. Milk is mixed with ice cream and flavored syrups in a blender to make milkshakes. Milk is often served in coffee and tea. Frothy steamed milk is used to prepare espresso-based drinks such as cafe latte

Vitamins in Milk

Vitamins have many roles in the body, including metabolism co-factors, oxygen transport and antioxidants. They help the body use carbohydrates, protein, and fat. The specific content of vitamins in milk is listed in the Nutrient Content Tables in the Nutrition Facts section.

Milk contains the water soluble vitamins thiamin (vitamin B1), riboflavin (vitamin B2), niacin (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), vitamin B12 (cobalamin), vitamin C, and folate. Milk is a good source of thiamin, riboflavin and vitamin B12 . Milk contains small amounts of niacin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin C, and folate and is not considered a major source of these vitamins in the diet.

Milk contains the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K. The content level of fat soluble vitamins in dairy products depends on the fat content of the product. Reduced fat (2% fat), lowfat (1% fat), and skim milk must be fortified with vitamin A to be nutritionally equivalent to whole milk. Fortification of all milk with vitamin D is voluntary. Milk contains small amounts of vitamins E and K and is not considered a major source of these vitamins in the diet.

Minerals in Milk

Minerals have many roles in the body including enzyme functions, bone formation, water balance maintenance, and oxygen transport. The specific content of minerals in milk is listed in the Nutrient Content Tables in the Nutrition Facts section.

Milk is a good source of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, and zinc. Many minerals in milk are associated together in the form of salts, such as calcium phosphate. In milk approximately 67% of the calcium, 35% of the magnesium, and 44% of the phosphate are salts bound within the casein micelle and the remainder are soluble in the serum phase. The fact that calcium and phosphate are associated as salts bound with the protein does not affect the nutritional availability of either calcium or phosphate.

Milk contains small amounts of copper, iron, manganese, and sodium and is not considered a major source of these minerals in the diet.